Labeling Power Cords

August 30, 2010

Recently, I spent time with someone who had to unplug a couple of computer components and had to chase down each cord by hand.  He was a little frustrated by this exercise.  I imparted a little tip that I’ve used for years on power cords for my computer and television components.  Make little labels for each power cord.  They don’t have to be fancy labels, heck,  a little 2″ x 1/4″ slice of paper and some clear tape will do.  Just write VCR, TV, cable box or monitor, speakers, USB hub on the strip of paper, fold it in half (makes it about 1″ x 1/4″), wrap it around the end of the cord near the outlet plug and secure with tape – voila! you’ve just labeled your cord!

I couldn’t get a good pic of my computer cords, but here’s the one’s behind my tv, DVD, VCR.  cord labels for electronics

If you don’t quite get it from my description, email me and I’ll break it down for you! ;-)

Best to you!
Jan

Print Screen

October 17, 2009

Print Screen

Print Screen

I know you have seen the Print Screen button inthe upper right corner of your keyboard but have you ever used it?  I use it ALL the time.  When I work with clients on how to use their computer – Basics 101 – in my computer tutor training, I use the Print Screen to build a handout to leave with the client.

Print Screen is used with the Shift button to capture a snapshot of your computer screen or with the Alt button to capture a snapshot of your active window.  Take this snapshot and paste it into Word or another program.  Easy as pie!

EVA blog print screen

EVA blog print screen

Contact me if you have any questions – hope this helps!

Jan

Computer Tutoring

July 19, 2009

One of the services I offer is tutoring people on the basics of using the internet, their computer, and multiple programs.  Initially, they seem a bit embarrassed about contacting me, but after a quick discussion, they realize I’m not going to belittle them for not being super savvy when it comes to their computer knowledge.  I am t/here to help!

Most often my tutored clients start off thinking they are going to do irreparable damage and have ceased using their computer.  First of all, it is really hard to “break” your computer by clicking on the wrong file or in the wrong space.  Secondly, there are numerous avenues available to complete a task.  i.e.: cut and paste in Word by selecting the item/words then  a) use the edit drop-down menu, or b) right click for a pop-up menu, or c) use keyboard shortcuts Ctrl+x then Ctrl+v .

I encourage them to go about it the way that makes them the most comfortable and before long they wonder what they did before they used their computer for everything!  (Heck, I rarely use the telephone directory anymore – I go online to anywho.com).

Best to you,

Jan

Anti Virus

February 27, 2009

So, I scheduled an onsite “Computer Tutor” training session today for a client who claims to be not-so-savvy when it comes to the computer.  Very typical scenario, he’s newer to computers and finds them a bit intimidating.  Not a problem, that’s why I’m here.  (I offer virtual training and onsite training for those who want me to personally walk them through the steps and show them the how-to’s. )

He needed help accessing and surfing the World Wide Web, installing a program he bought, setting up a new email account, and walking him through some basic steps.

When I got there, the “normal” pop-up window (that “always comes up”) appeared stating they needed to update/upgrade their virus protection software.  This entailed purchasing a new, more expensive version.

This aggravates the hooey out of me because for the average user, there are terrific FREE versions of protection from reputable companies.   We downloaded a new FREE program, scanned his system, and removed the old program.  Voila!  It didn’t take long, he’s protected, and it was …. oh, that’s right, FREE!

Let me know if you have any questions!

Best to you,

Jan
Professional Virtual Assistant